Music In and Of the City

 

The following is the photo story I worked on for the past two weeks with The School of The New York Times, including only a few of the photos featured.

A New York City street corner is an entity of blasting car horns, stranger’s voices, wind howling between skyscrapers, and a myriad of types of street music. Hectically, people move from place to place with ambition and a fast pace, unable to stop and listen to the true music a busy street corner can create. If an individual happens to listen closely, blasting car horns become drums, voices create a melody, and a busy street corner turns into a piece of music.

Melodies within the city adds to the music that New York City represents as a whole. Street performers line the sidewalks handling instruments from an accordion, to a guitar, to one’s own voice. New York is a melting pot of all culture, and these instruments represent that culture and define the personality of the city. In Chinatown, street musicians can be seen playing Erhus, a two-string bowed instrument, or a Chinese banjo. In the subway stations, musical performances may range from an accordion to opera singing. Each borough and neighborhood is rich in culture and spirit, and music enhances that culture.

Looking beyond the instruments themselves, the people behind them all have a story as well. Some musicians are looking for recognition, like the band Blac Rabbit who plays in the Time Square subway station. Other musicians are using their talents to raise money due to situations of homelessness, a lost job, or in an attempt to gain extra funds. All of these people, however, share the similarity of a love for music, and wanting to reach tourists and bystanders by their melodies.

The music within the city and the musicians who play the instruments add to the piece of music that New York creates. Different moods are set by actions that add to the connotation of the city’s song, and the noises, scenes, and people create bars of music. New York: a melting pot, a cultural hotspot, and rich in music, in and of the city.

 

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